• And then ?

    Posté le 12 June 2013


     

     

    During the trip, we sometimes thought about our friends and relatives, wanting to share the special moments we could live. On an other hand, you don’t want to come back and begin to imagine the life you could build in this place.

    When we finally came back and after seeing all our friends and relatives again, the following weeks were sometimes very hard. When, during four months, you only had to think about choosing your way, eating, finding a place to sleep and more than anything enjoying : the everyday life is kind of tasteless.

    We also ended our trip in Japan where respect and zen attitude were not only foreigner’s ideas about the country. Useless to say that the first french incivilities we had to face were good reasons to return to Japan.

    During 4 months, we also met and lived with people with so few money that you learn how to appreciate the good times and to put things into perspective.  As a result, we had to shut our mouthes sometimes to not tell people things like : “you know what ? there are people wo live with a tenth of what we have, so stop complaining!”

    So, to answer the question everyone asked us : “Not so hard to come back ?”

    What’s so hard, is to face again what you were happy to leave few months before, when leaving.

    We’re happy, and we mean really happy we could achieve our goal and don’t want to be nostalgic, it was a great moment as we hope there will be plenty of during our life.

    You also asked us a lot if we had news from the people we met during the trip :

    At the beginning, yes, we exchanged a lot of emails with the hosts and should even have received some of them.

    Now, we only got few contacts with some of them : the polish people, some french travellers and the german couple, Katrin and Roland (riding a bike from Germany to China), now living in India !

    Natalia and Nick, the couple from Tcheliabinsk are now the happy parents of a little boy.

    And we could not forget the JoNi, who are now living in India and share their incredible stories on a new blog (Love It!)

    For all the other people, we keep in mind the good times we had with them and understand that sometimes, distance and time don’t help you to keep contact (and we should admit we are not good at giving news)

    And now ?

    The new motorcycle we wanted so much (Hayabusa) will wait cause a little globe-trotter arrived in the family on the 7th of May.

    Lou began his story with a legend : The medics say that he was made on the 29th of August. But we were in the plane, back to France on this day…

    Lou

    A little wink to show him how love can fly through borders and to pass him the taste of adventure.

    We can’t know if we will be good parents, but we will try very hard.

    On the other hand, through this website, we swear you can have beautiful dreams and will do our best to place some stars in your eyes.

    Our Van-Van now has a successor and will wait for some repairs to ride again ; At least, it’s purring when we start it.

    Meanwhile, we are planning some little trips in the Europe before starting a new big adventure : Driving all along South America.

    We will wait for Lou to grow a little bit and to have some money back before leaving ;)

    But that, is another story…

    Lou


  • Tokyo – Geek & Chic

    Posté le 26 March 2013


       

    5 small days… It was the only bit of time left for us to visit the City.

    We could have walked and stroll about but after all these kilometers, there comes a time when your body gets tired, maybe the slipping of the end of the way.

    So we decided to target some well-known areas like :

     Harajuku & Aoyama : Real fashion districts, it’s impressive to look at Tokyo people gathering there to find the next clothes to wear. For us, it was kind of a festival of incredible styles and good mood. We then made our way a bit more to the north to reach Omote-Sando area more quiet and « bohemian » where creators’ stores  mix street art and architecture of wood and glass.

    If your passion for mode and architecture is huge, you can go on in the Roppongi and Ginza areas, where luxury shops designed by the most famous architects show up on broad avenues. We went there to glance at the buildings but we went our way because it would have been as searching for the Champs Elysées in Tokyo. (Lots of French luxury shops as Japanese people love it)

    We then moved to an emblematic area for each geek in the world : Akihabara, the electronic town.

    It’s the perfect place for testing and discovering all kind of video games so don’t be ashamed if japanese play a lot better than you or if your husband is like a kid when looking at all the figurines reminding him his childhood.

    Curiosity also lead us into some sex-shops to confirm or not what some friends told us about the shadow face of Japanese people that you can notice each day : they look very shy generally speaking and are a bit less when night is coming ;)

    One of our best tour was the walk into Tsukiji fish market, even if now that some tourists went too far, rules are a bit more strict. The main roads around the market are also a good place if you’re looking for some dishes.

    Finally, we went on a jaunt in Mitaka city, in Tokyo’s green suburb, very pleasant to visit but mainly crowded because of the Ghibli museum. Small details from different animes are everywhere in the streets. Once in the museum, it is not allowed to take some photographs, a precious rule to build your memories.


  • And finally Tokyo – 1st part

    Posté le 20 January 2013


    After all these kilometers, all these visited lands, all these people met, we finally reached our ultimate goal : Tôkyô.

    Impressive megalopolis, it’s at least as zen and secured as the whole country. For sure, the liveliness of the streets and the quantity of inhabitants per square meter are not the same, but the huge respect of the rules and other people is the way to obtain harmony where chaos would raise everywhere else.

    We travelled dozens of kilometers by foot or in the subway in overcrowded places without suffering this density. We walked around areas as calm as small countryside villages, and then discovered the eccentricity of electronic towns. But this is another story…

     


  • Japan time !

    Posté le 6 November 2012


    After more than 16000 kilometers on the roads, we reach our goal and finally discover Japan under a scorching heat. Here, respect and traditions are omnipresent, and everything is all about refinement and invitation to wonder.


  • Back to Fuji San and discovering Itô

    Posté le 23 October 2012


    When we climbed mount Fuji, we were not lucky enough to admire it from the plain and so, we felt like missing something. That’s why we decided, on the road to Tôkyô, to spend some time again in this magical area.

    For sure, The Lord of the Place was missing its well known snowy dome, but the sight offered by the sun warming the top and unveiling the reddening shade of volcano stone completely amazed us. Then, we decided to drive around the 5 lakes rimming it, to contemplate it from every angle and keep forever in mind thesewonderful images.

    Before reaching japanese megalopolis, we agreed to take advantage of pacific ocean by visiting the city of Itô, where we could also relax our painful muscles in one of the oldest onsen sheltered by a splendid Ryokan. This time, the last kilometers and the end of the trip were looming on the horizon.


  • D’Osaka au Koya San

    Posté le 22 September 2012


     

    Après avoir visité Nara puis Kyoto, on a eu du mal à s’émerveiller devant l’architecture ou l’ambiance des autres villes. Osaka ne nous aura donc pas laissé un souvenir impérissable, et on a dû vadrouiller comme on aime si bien le faire, pour trouver quelques petits quartiers agréables et dignes d’intérêt.

    On avait notamment entendu parler du château bien sûr, mais aussi du quartier électronique Den-Den Town à l’animation permanente et dont les éclairages vous submergent une fois la nuit tombée. On nous avait aussi conseillé de visiter l’aquarium de la ville, connu pour être l’un des plus beaux au monde et qui abrite notamment un requin baleine et de majestueuses raies Manta, ainsi qu’une collection impressionnante de méduses aux 1000 couleurs.

    On a ensuite pris la direction de Koya-San, réputé pour son immense cimetière plusieurs fois centenaire et dont l’atmosphère reposante vous fait sentir le poids de son âge. Malheureusement, notre étape du jour étant gargantuesque, on ne s’y est pas attardé trop longtemps et on a repris la route pour rejoindre à nouveau le Fuji San, afin de profiter des 5 lacs de la région, mais ça, c’est une autre histoire !

     


  • Kyoto – Deuxième partie

    Posté le 12 September 2012


     

    Pour ne pas faire de jaloux, on a voulu aller voir le pavillon d’argent le lendemain. Et autant on peut comprendre l’engouement autour de son homologue doré, autant celui-ci ne vaut vraiment pas le détour ! Alors on a profité de son jardin merveilleusement entretenu, qui à lui seul peut justifier le tarif affiché à l’entrée.

    Ensuite, on a filé au cœur de Kyoto non loin de notre hostel, vers le marché culinaire couvert de Nishiki et ses nombreux petits stands colorés. La foule y est dense et on aurait envie de s’arrêter picorer tous les quelques mètres tant les effluves qui en émanent vous font saliver.

    Enfin, on s’est enfoncé dans quelques-uns des vieux quartiers de la ville pour y découvrir des temples (oui encore, mais ceux-là étaient différents), des échoppes traditionnelles ou encore des curiosités comme le parc de Fushimi et ses innombrables portiques rougeoyants.


  • Kyoto – Première partie

    Posté le 5 September 2012


      

    Ce que nous allons écrire n’est pas novateur mais autant Tokyo est synonyme de moderne autant Kyoto vous plonge dans l’ancestral.

    Nous avons commencé notre visite par le Pavillon d’Or, resplendissant dans son écrin de verdure. Pour la petite histoire, au début seul un étage était en or mais  suite à sa destruction, lorsqu’il fût reconstruit on décida que tous les étages seraient en or.

    Nombre de japonais s’y rendent et y font de nombreuses offrandes à des statues au bord du chemin  du temple.

    Etant arrivés au moment de  la fête de l’Obon (fête des Morts), nous avons pu voir les gens écrire leurs vœux sur des briquettes de bois qui servent à alimenter les signes qu’on embrase à la nuit tombée sur cinq montagnes entourant la ville afin « que les esprits montent au ciel ».

    Pendant ce temps, des lanternes flottent sur l’étang Hirosawa,  guidant les esprits des défunts vers l’au-delà.

    Le lendemain, nous avons visité le quartier  proche de Gion avant d’y flâner la nuit. Réputé pour la présence de geishas, l’architecture des rues vaut sans conteste le détour.

    Nous avons eu la chance (ou plutôt nous avons marché et marché encore) de croiser plusieurs Geishas. Les voir est un instant magique comme si vous croisiez une légende…

    NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
    img_6233
    img_6244
    img_6251
    img_6252
    img_6259
    img_6265
    img_6276
    img_6282
    img_6293
    img_6297
    img_6298
    img_6299
    img_6321
    img_6351
    img_6362
    img_6373
    img_6380
    img_6413
    img_6418
    img_6435
    img_6441


  • En route pour Nara

    Posté le 1 September 2012


      

    Lorsque le soleil a pu percer les nuages, il nous a offert le spectacle grandiose d’une vue sur les lacs en contrebas entourés de villes partiellement éclairées, de rizières verdoyantes et de chaines de montagne à l’horizon. On nous avait dit que la descente allait être difficile, mais à ce moment précis, ce n’était pas important.

    Mais il a quand même fallu repartir, et si l’ascension s’est faite dans les nuages sans opportunité d’admirer les paysages, le trajet retour nous remplissait les yeux à chaque virage. Finalement moins difficile que ce à quoi on s’attendait, on a rejoint la 5ème station assez rapidement avant de prendre le bus puis la moto direction l’ouest du Kansai.

    Nous avons pris pour la première fois l’autoroute pour rallier Nagoya : quel bonheur ! Que des lignes droites sans feux rouges et un bon 80 km/ h bien vite dépassé lorsque vous vous rendez compte qu’absolument personne ne le respecte.

    Nous n’avons passé qu’une nuit à Nagoya, ville très industrielle qui présente cependant l’avantage d’avoir été conçue pour la circulation des voitures, le siège du constructeur Toyota étant basé ici. Nous avons donc pu trouver notre hôtel rapidement et aller explorer un des seuls quartiers intéressants de la ville rasée pendant la seconde guerre mondiale, le quartier d’Osu.

    Il s’agit de ruelles sous des arcades où se mélangent petits stands de nourriture, boutiques  et librairies mangas.

    Le lendemain, nous avons rejoint la ville de Nara. Franchement, cette ville semble comme sortie d’un conte de fées. Peu étendue, elle offre un parfait mix entre  vestiges traditionnels, vie contemporaine et verdure. Nous y sommes restés deux jours mais aurions pu nous y prélasser une semaine tant il y fait bon vivre.

    Cerise sur le gâteau, des daims circulent en liberté dans la ville car ils sont considérés comme sacrés. Pas du tout timides, il faut juste veiller à ne pas manger trop près d’eux au risque d’y laisser sa pitance.

    Nous avons fait une grande ballade qui permet de voir les temples classés au Patrimoine de l’Unesco pour ensuite goûter une spécialité que nous n’avions pas encore eu la possibilité de manger : les Okonomi-yaki, crêpes faites à base d’omelettes auxquelles on rajoute des ingrédients ( légumes marinés, nouilles sautées, fromage etc.. ), bref un régal pas très digeste !

    NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
    img_6079
    img_6093
    img_6115
    img_6125
    img_6130
    img_6142
    img_6151
    img_6169
    img_6179
    img_6188
    img_6201
    img_6209
    img_6215
    img_6219
    img_6220
    img_6226
    img_6227
    img_6153


  • De Nikko au mont Fuji

    Posté le 27 August 2012


    Puis nous avons mis le cap vers l’une des destinations phares du Japon : Le Fuji San. Et on aura rapidement compris qu’on était bien entré dans le Kansai quand les routes sont devenues plus chargées, et que les campagnes se sont raréfiées. On a choisi une guest house présente un peu partout dans le sud du Japon, K’s House au lac Kawaguchiko, pour poser nos valises avant l’ascension du lendemain. Et en arrivant aux abords du lac, on se demandait toujours où pouvait bien être le mont Fuji, pourtant si immense. Ce n’est finalement qu’après que les nuages aient décidé de déserter un peu la région qu’il laissa apparaître sa silhouette.

    On avait décidé d’opter pour une formule de grimpette jugée assez simple par les randonneurs, à savoir accéder de la 5ème station (1500m d’altitude) jusqu’à un refuge situé proche du sommet (~3400m d’altitude) où l’on passerait la nuit avant de repartir de nuit pour admirer le lever du soleil depuis le sommet. On s’est donc rendu à cette fameuse station… en bus! Car oui, il est interdit d’y aller avec un véhicule personnel, seuls les bus et autres véhicules de tourisme sont acceptés ici.

    On a commencé notre ascension vers 12h, rencontrant une difficulté assez progressive et des chemins assez larges au départ. D’ailleurs, on croise toutes les générations lors de cette randonnée, mais les visages exténués des promeneurs sur la descente ne nous rassuraient pas trop. Au bout de 2h déjà, la pente se faisait bien plus raide, et la progression bien plus lente. Il faut alors savoir adapter son rythme, entre marche, pauses courtes et pauses plus longues. Après un peu moins de 4h, nous avions gravi presque 2000m et atteignions déjà notre refuge. En temps et en heure si l’on en juge par le déluge qui s’est abattu quelques minutes seulement après notre arrivée, les jambes lourdes mais la chaleur des lieux nous réconfortant déjà.

    On découvrait alors ce à quoi on avait droit pour 150 euros la nuit à deux : Un couchage de 60cm de large à peine, perdu au milieu d’une rangée d’une trentaine de matelas. Autant vous dire que l’intimité n’existe pas, et que le confort est sommaire. Heureusement , en arrivant tôt, on a pu profiter d’un peu de calme pour se reposer avant le dîner compris dans la formule. Dîner qui consiste en un plateau repas finalement assez copieux et pas trop mauvais, suffisant pour reprendre des forces avant la suite, le lendemain.

    Autant vous dire que la nuit ne s’est pas bien passée, ayant tous les deux eu des suées surement dues au repas du soir, à moins que ce ne soit le mal de l’altitude (3400m ici). Mais lorsque le réveil a sonné et après nous être bien couvert, on a alors découvert le flot de touristes (surtout locaux) qui avançait au pas vers le sommet. On a pris notre mal en patience pendant presque 1h30, puis quelques minutes avant d’apercevoir le soleil, nous avons décidé de nous poser sur le côté, à quelques mètres du sommet, pour admirer les paysages qui se révélaient sous nos yeux.

    A suivre…

    NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
    img_5939
    img_5941
    img_5943
    img_5949
    img_5966
    img_5968
    img_5971
    img_5992
    img_6043
    img_6060
    img_6077